Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

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Web: http://www.kit.edu


Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) articles

Displaying 1 - 20 of 23

Solar glasses can generate solar power

Solar glasses can generate solar power
Organic solar cells are flexible, transparent, and light-weight - and can be manufactured in arbitrary shapes or colours. Thus, they are suitable for a variety of applications that cannot be realised with conventional silicon solar cells. In the Energy Technology journal, researchers from KIT now present sunglasses with coloured, semitransparent solar cells applied onto lenses that supply a microprocessor and two displays with electric power.
3rd August 2017

Solar module has unprecedented power conversion of 17.8%

Solar module has unprecedented power conversion of 17.8%
Scientists from imec have announced that they have fabricated a thin-film solar module stack made up of perovskite and CIGS (Copper Indium Gallium Selenide) with a conversion efficiency of 17.8%. For the first time, this tandem module surpasses the highest efficiencies of separate perovskite and CIGS modules.
27th September 2016

Smart buoy for measuring water pollutants

Smart buoy for measuring water pollutants
All over the world, lakes, rivers, and coastal waters are threatened by high nutrient inputs. Nitrate or phosphates from waste-waters or fertilisers causes eutrophication. The consequence: Algae, in particular cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), grow uncontrollably and may release toxic substances.
8th September 2016


EU grants €50,000 prize to energy researchers

EU grants €50,000 prize to energy researchers
The EU SOFT Innovation Prize for fusion research in the amount of €50,000 is awarded to a team of researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Swiss Plasma Center (SPC). Scientists of the Institute for Technical Physics of KIT have developed a novel superconducting conductor concept.
5th September 2016

Converting gases into high quality fuels

Converting gases into high quality fuels
A new partnership has been agreed between Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and INERATEC which will see the former invest in a spinoff that could revolutionise chemical process engineering and contribute to the success of the energiewende in the area of chemical energy storage systems.
24th August 2016

Saharan dust: reliable forecasts for photovoltaic output

Saharan dust: reliable forecasts for photovoltaic output
A hazy sky and dirty cars are well-known consequences of Saharan dust carried to Europe by air currents. As part of the 'PerduS' project, the German Weather Service (DWD), the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and meteocontrol are currently examining how dust – as haze in the atmosphere and deposited on solar panels – affects the output of photovoltaic systems.
27th July 2016

Photovoltaic cells replicate rose petals

Photovoltaic cells replicate rose petals
Scientists of KIT (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) reproduced the epidermal cells of rose petals that have particularly good antireflection properties and integrated the transparent replicas into an organic solar cell. This resulted in a relative efficiency gain of twelve percent. An article on this subject has been published recently in the Advanced Optical Materials journal.
24th June 2016

Solar power home storage systems will be put to test

Solar power home storage systems will be put to test
Home storage systems for electricity produced by photovoltaics facilities are gaining attractiveness, as their costs are declining. However, standardised, verifiable criteria for the end client to assess their performance are still lacking. Now, scientists have launched the largest German study so far to analyse commercial systems with respect to safety, quality, and grid suitability and to derive recommendations for manufacturers, standardisation bodies, and authorities.
13th June 2016

Using UV radiation to clean water without chemicals

Using UV radiation to clean water without chemicals
Water is a resource and is used for cooling or as a solvent. Water is also indispensable in industrial production. Environmentally compatible processing of water now is subject of the 'Eco-UV' research project funded by the EU with €3.9m under the 'Horizon 2020' programme. Within the framework of the project, KIT engineers plan to develop efficient UV emitters and long-lived electronic systems.
10th May 2016

Just how noisy are wind turbines?

Just how noisy are wind turbines?
A key part of our future renewable energy mix will be wind energy, and a new German-based project is aiming at improving the planning, development and acceptance of wind power plants. Experts will study the interaction of acoustic and seismic vibrations of wind power plants and will generate a model to compute both emissions. TremAc is funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy.
4th May 2016

Extension of wind parks in the North Sea

Extension of wind parks in the North Sea
In 2015 alone, more than 500 offshore wind turbines were connected to the grid in Germany. So far, mutual interactions of wind parks and their potential effects on local climate have been approximated with models only. Thanks to their wide installation, however, it is now possible for the first time to study their effects in reality: Wind parks are in the focus of the research project “WIPAFF – Wind Park Far Field” that is coordinated by climate researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and executed in cooperation with science and industry partners.
18th April 2016

Organic waste for sustainable batteries

Organic waste for sustainable batteries
A carbon-based active material produced from apple leftovers and a material of layered oxides might help reduce the costs of future energy storage systems. Both were found to have excellent electrochemical properties and stand for the environmentally compatible and sustainable use of resources. Now, these materials are presented by researchers of the Helmholtz Institute Ulm of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in the journals ChemElectroChem and Advanced Energy Materials.
18th February 2016

Realising the solar potential of private homes

Realising the solar potential of private homes
Recently, Google started the Sunroof project, a service that calculates potential energy savings of home owners due to solar facilities on their roofs. However, this project covers a few cities in the US only. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and European partners have now finished the EAGLESolar research project. It covers the same activities in European cities and takes into account local conditions. Among the test regions is Karlsruhe with its districts of Knielingen and Nordweststadt.
4th January 2016

Data analysis for improved energy efficiency

Data analysis for improved energy efficiency
New research from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is developing methods to evaluate data from complex energy supply systems and identify optimisation options. Extension of future-proof energy systems is one of the major challenges faced by society in the next decades. These energy systems will have to be able to flexibly cope with different inputs from renewable energy sources and fluctuating demands. For this purpose, complex computerised solutions will be required.
27th November 2015

Next generation energy storage - kinetic recovery

Next generation energy storage - kinetic recovery
In Germany the concept of energiewende (the country’s transition to an energy portfolio dominated by renewable energy, energy efficiency and sustainable development), inherently includes smart energy use. However, there is not yet any storage system that could be used by industry to efficiently recover braking energy of the many machines in Germany.
25th November 2015

Generate energy from methane without carbon dioxide

Generate energy from methane without carbon dioxide
The production of energy from natural gas without generating carbon dioxide emissions could fast become a reality, thanks to a novel technology developed by researchers of the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT).
19th November 2015

"Invisibility cloak" material could cut wasted solar energy

"Invisibility cloak" material could cut wasted solar energy
Progress towards renewable energy sources is slow, in part because their efficiency is much lower than that of conventional energy sources. The efficiency of commercially available photovoltaic cells, for instance, is about 20%. Scientists at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have published an unconventional approach to increasing the efficiency of the panels. Optical invisibility cloaks guide sunlight around objects that cast a shadow on the solar panel, such as contacts for current extraction.
9th October 2015

Research aims for non-toxic perovskite production

Research aims for non-toxic perovskite production
The efficiency of perovskite-based solar cells has been improved significantly in recent years. On the way towards maturity, however, some challenges remain as yet unmastered. Scientists from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are undertaking research to advance the development of perovskite solar cells. By using special thin-film processes, for example, material consumption and costs can be reduced.
23rd July 2015

Metal-organic framework enables single-component PV

Metal-organic framework enables single-component PV
Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a material suited for photovoltaics. For the first time, a functioning organic solar cell consisting of a single component has been produced on the basis of Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) compounds. The material is highly elastic and might also be used for the flexible coating of clothes and deformable components.
22nd June 2015

Grass could address problems of maize as biogas fuel

Production of biogas from silage maize is booming, but also has its drawbacks. Maize monocultures block increasingly large areas for food production and result in a monotonous landscape. Unused grass from landscaping is an ecological alternative to maize, if economic drawbacks are compensated, reveals a recent study by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the University of Hohenheim, which focused on locations in Baden-Württemberg.
29th May 2015


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