Lund University

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Lund University articles

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Four lifestyle choices that most reduce carbon footprint

Four lifestyle choices that most reduce carbon footprint
A new study has identified the four actions that would have the greatest impact on an individual’s greenhouse gas emissions: eating a plant-based diet, avoiding air travel, living car free, and having fewer children. The comprehensive study analysed 39 peer-reviewed articles, carbon calculators and government sources to quantify the most high-impact personal lifestyle choices in developed countries.
12th July 2017

Substituting floating plastic for floating houses

Substituting floating plastic for floating houses
Architect student Ludvig Hofsten wanted to address the issues of rising sea levels and plastic waste in the ocean. He designed Villa Nemo, a project that sees the potential of living on water in the future; with both lifestyle and environmental benefits. ”Our cities are becoming fairly dense, and there’s less space to build new houses. Quite a lot of cities are starting to look at the possibility of building on water”, says Ludvig Hofsten.
11th July 2017

Perovskite increases efficiency of solar cells

Perovskite increases efficiency of solar cells
  Researchers from Lund University in Sweden and from Fudan University in China have successfully designed a new structural organization using the promising solar cell material perovskite. The study shows that solar cells increase in efficiency thanks to the material’s ability to self-organise by standing on edge.
24th May 2017


Photosynthesis may lead to next-gen solar cells

Photosynthesis may lead to next-gen solar cells
For the first time, researchers have successfully measured in detail the flow of solar energy, in and between different parts of a photosynthetic organism. The result is a first step in research that could ultimately contribute to the development of technologies that use solar energy far more efficiently than what is currently possible. For about 80 years, researchers have known that photochemical reactions inside an organism do not occur in the same place as where it absorbs sunlight.
18th July 2016

Nanoplastics can negatively affect aquatic animals

Nanoplastics can negatively affect aquatic animals
Plastic accounts for nearly 80% of all waste found in our oceans, gradually breaking down into smaller and smaller particles. New research from Lund University investigates how nanosized plastic particles affect aquatic animals in different parts of the food chain. “Not very many studies have been done on this topic before. Plastic particles of such a small size are difficult to study”, says Karin Mattsson.
25th May 2016

Solar cells could soon be based on iron molecules

Solar cells could soon be based on iron molecules
Researchers at Lund University have successfully explained how iron-based dyes work on a molecular level in solar cells. The new findings will accelerate the development of inexpensive and environmentally friendly solar cells. The goal is to be able to use iron-based dyes in solar cells in the future. By using iron instead of other more expensive and rare metals, the production of solar cells and light catchers will become cheaper and more environmentally friendly.
23rd May 2016


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POWER & ENERGY 2017
22nd November 2017
Rwanda Kigali