Energy Efficient Products

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Converting dirty aluminium foil into a biofuel catalyst

Converting dirty aluminium foil into a biofuel catalyst
A researcher at Queen's University Belfast has discovered a way to convert dirty aluminium foil into a biofuel catalyst, which could help to solve global waste and energy problems. In the UK, around 20,000 tonnes of aluminium foil packaging is wasted each year - enough to stretch to the moon and back. Most of this is landfilled or incinerated as it's usually contaminated by grease and oils, which can damage recycling equipment.
27th July 2017

Transforming power quality for the renewable age

Transforming power quality for the renewable age
Following the landmark COP21 agreement to reduce carbon emissions, Steve Hughes, managing director of REO UK explores why rail providers need to be prepared for the inevitable shift to renewable energy and to manage potential power quality issues that may arise.
21st July 2017

Device provides energy-recycling steps

Device provides energy-recycling steps
Researchers at Georgia Tech and Emory University have created a device that makes walking up and down stairs easier. They’ve built energy-recycling stairs that store a user’s energy during descent and return energy to the user during ascent. The spring-loaded stairs compress when someone comes down the stairs, saving energy otherwise dissipated through impact and braking forces at the ankle by 26%.
14th July 2017


Photosynthesis could help develop computer technology

Photosynthesis could help develop computer technology
  Scientists at the University of Sheffield have published research illuminating how energy is transferred in molecules - something that could influence new molecular technologies for the future. Energy and charge transfer is what drives photosynthesis and any solar-to-chemical or electrical-to-chemical energy conversion.
11th July 2017

Substituting floating plastic for floating houses

Substituting floating plastic for floating houses
Architect student Ludvig Hofsten wanted to address the issues of rising sea levels and plastic waste in the ocean. He designed Villa Nemo, a project that sees the potential of living on water in the future; with both lifestyle and environmental benefits. ”Our cities are becoming fairly dense, and there’s less space to build new houses. Quite a lot of cities are starting to look at the possibility of building on water”, says Ludvig Hofsten.
11th July 2017

Self-powered system makes smarter windows

Self-powered system makes smarter windows
  By applying a solar cell technology, researchers at Princeton University have developed a different type of smart window: a self-powered version that could be inexpensive and easy to apply to windows. This system features solar cells that selectively absorb near-ultraviolet (near-UV) light, so the new windows are completely self-powered.
30th June 2017

Energy efficient luminaire reduces carbon footprint

Energy efficient luminaire reduces carbon footprint
  A compact and durable universal luminaire designed for demanding applications has been introduced to Aura Light's family of lighting products, called the Zurrro.
15th June 2017

Let's knock some sense into climate change

Let's knock some sense into climate change
  Self-proclaimed geek, Damon Hart-Davis, can’t be accused of aiming low. He genuinely believes the smart energy management technology he has developed will make its way onto 400 million radiators, and save homeowners billions, as he explained to Breakthrough magazine.
7th June 2017

Biomass power station aims for zero carbon footprint

Biomass power station aims for zero carbon footprint
Italy's largest agricultural biomass power plant has opened, integrating four 1MW generators using Movicon SCADA technology for control and visualisation for efficiency monitoring. The SCADA system is providing the information required to provide power for 10,000 homes while offsetting the carbon generated by the plant with the carbon consumed by the in-feed crops as they grow, resulting in a target zero carbon footprint.
2nd June 2017

Tesco uses Honeywell refrigerant to reduce carbon emissions

Tesco uses Honeywell refrigerant to reduce carbon emissions
Honeywell have announced that Tesco, one of the world’s largest supermarket chains, is converting more than 1,200 stores across the United Kingdom to Honeywell’s Solstice N40 refrigerant in order to meet its carbon reduction commitments. The conversion will take place over the next three years, with the first 60 stores already converted.
30th May 2017


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RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham