Energy Harvesting

Displaying 1 - 10 of 143

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion
A new, ultrathin energy harvesting system developed at Vanderbilt University's Nanomaterials and Energy Devices Laboratory can generate electrical current from the full range of human motions and is thin enough to embed in clothing. Based on battery technology and made from layers of black phosphorus that are only a few atoms thick, the new device generates small amounts of electricity when it is bent or pressed even at the extremely low frequencies characteristic of human motion.
25th July 2017

Addressing the skills needs of the global marine energy sector

Addressing the skills needs of the global marine energy sector
Aiming to address the immediate and long-term skills needs of the global marine energy sector, a new UK-based company has launched. Headquartered in Cornwall, south-west England, UTM Consultants will leverage its extensive network together with its industry experience to source and supply the manpower solutions required to deliver complex ROV, survey, inspection, repair and maintenance projects to the oil and gas, renewable, hydrographic, marine, power and telecommunications sectors.
12th July 2017

Battery-free cellphone harvests ambient power

Battery-free cellphone harvests ambient power
University of Washington researchers have invented a cellphone that requires no batteries - a major leap forward in moving beyond chargers, cords and dying phones. Instead, the phone harvests the few microwatts of power it requires from either ambient radio signals or light. The team also made Skype calls using its battery-free phone, demonstrating that the prototype made of commercial, off-the-shelf components can receive and transmit speech and communicate with a base station.
6th July 2017


Molecular cages improve energy conversion and drug delivery

Molecular cages improve energy conversion and drug delivery
Scientists from Trinity College Dublin and AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland-funded materials science research centre hosted in Trinity College Dublin, have created 'molecular cages' that can maximise the efficiency of converting molecules in chemical reactions, and that may in future also be used as sensors and drug-delivery agents. The cages can be packed with different molecules, many of which have a specific task or functionality.
30th June 2017

Technology makes electricity from urine and kills pathogens

Technology makes electricity from urine and kills pathogens
A scientific breakthrough has taken an emerging biotechnology a step closer to being used to treat wastewater in the Developing World. Researchers at the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) (Ieropoulos & Greenman) have discovered that technology they have developed which has already been proven to generate electricity through the process of cleaning organic waste, such as urine, also kills bacteria harmful to humans.
20th June 2017

Harvesting energy with old bike parts

Harvesting energy with old bike parts
A wave energy harvester powerful enough to charge a mobile phone has been developed by researchers at Nottingham Trent University. The harvester has been made out of old bike parts and a disused pressure cooker. BSc Product Design undergraduate Owen Griffiths and Professor Amin Al-Habaibeh, a professor of intelligent engineering systems, created the energy harvester to help people in developing countries with poor access to electricity.  
7th June 2017

Commercial plant captures CO2 from the air

Commercial plant captures CO2 from the air
The world’s first commercial plant that captures atmospheric CO2 for supply and sale to a customer has been launched by Climeworks. The Swiss direct air capture company launched the commercial-scale Direct Air Capture (DAC) plant, featuring its patented technology that filters carbon dioxide from ambient air. The plant is now supplying 900 tonnes of CO2 annually to a nearby greenhouse to help grow vegetables.
5th June 2017

Biomass power station aims for zero carbon footprint

Biomass power station aims for zero carbon footprint
Italy's largest agricultural biomass power plant has opened, integrating four 1MW generators using Movicon SCADA technology for control and visualisation for efficiency monitoring. The SCADA system is providing the information required to provide power for 10,000 homes while offsetting the carbon generated by the plant with the carbon consumed by the in-feed crops as they grow, resulting in a target zero carbon footprint.
2nd June 2017

When mixing freshwater with saltwater produces energy

When mixing freshwater with saltwater produces energy
Penn State researchers have created a new hybrid technology that produces unprecedented amounts of electrical power where seawater and freshwater combine at the coast. "The goal of this technology is to generate electricity from where the rivers meet the ocean," said Christopher Gorski, assistant professor in environmental engineering at Penn State. "It's based on the difference in the salt concentrations between the two water sources."
30th May 2017

Polluted air could generate power

Polluted air could generate power
Researchers from the University of Antwerp and KU Leuven have succeeded in developing a process that purifies air and, at the same time, generates power. The device must only be exposed to light in order to function. “We use a small device with two rooms separated by a membrane,” explains Professor Sammy Verbruggen (UAntwerp/KU Leuven). “Air is purified on one side, while on the other side hydrogen gas is produced from a part of the degradation products".
8th May 2017


Energy Harvesting documents


Sign up to view our publications

Sign up

Sign up to view our downloads

Sign up

RWM 2017
12th September 2017
United Kingdom NEC, Birmingham