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Imperial College London articles

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Feature of nanomaterial makes harvesting sunlight easier

Feature of nanomaterial makes harvesting sunlight easier
Using sunlight to drive chemical reactions, such as artificial photosynthesis, could soon become much more efficient thanks to nanomaterials. This is the conclusion of a study published today led by researchers in the Department of Physics at Imperial College London, which could ultimately help improve solar energy technologies and be used for new applications, such as using sunlight to break down harmful chemicals.
29th March 2017

Alternative solar cells increase efficiency and stability

Alternative solar cells increase efficiency and stability
Imperial researchers are designing cheaper and more flexible solar energy materials, set to rival traditional rigid silicon panels. Solar cells are formed of light-absorbing materials that convert sunlight into electricity. The panels we are used to seeing covering fields or roofs of houses are made primarily from silicon. However, silicon panels are energy-intensive to produce, heavy and inflexible.
12th January 2017

Tool calculates renewable energy output anywhere in the world

Tool calculates renewable energy output anywhere in the world
Researchers have created an interactive web tool to estimate the amount of energy that could be generated by wind or solar farms at any location. The tool, called Renewables.ninja, aims to make the task of predicting renewable output easier for both academics and industry. The creators, from Imperial College London and ETH Zürich, have already used it to estimate current Europe-wide solar and wind output, and companies such as the German electrical supplier RWE are using it to test their own models of output.
6th September 2016


Organisms re-engineered to produce green fuels

Organisms re-engineered to produce green fuels
A project to develop clean fuels using microscopic organisms called cyanobacteria has been given the green light. Cyanobacteria get their energy from sunlight through photosynthesis. They excrete oxygen as a by-product. Billions of years ago they are thought to have dramatically changed the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere, stimulating a flourishing of different forms of life and leading to the near-extinction of organisms that were intolerant of oxygen.
10th August 2015

Ultra-thin membrane could cut industrial energy consumption

Ultra-thin membrane could cut industrial energy consumption
Engineers have developed an ultra-thin, super-strong membrane to filter liquids and gases, with the potential to cut energy consumption in industry. Membranes are selectively permeable barriers that can provide a filter for a range of processes, from removing salt from sea water in desalination plants, to filtering the blood of kidney patients in dialysis machines.
1st July 2015


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