KTH Royal Institute of Technology

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KTH Royal Institute of Technology articles

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Wave energy device tests begin in North Atlantic

Wave energy device tests begin in North Atlantic
Europe is on a quest to make renewable energy available to remote coastal areas and islands. That’s the motivation behind the testing of a powerful Swedish-designed wave energy conversion system in the North Atlantic. Europe is on a quest to make renewable energy available to remote coastal areas and islands. That’s the motivation behind the testing of a powerful Swedish-designed wave energy conversion system in the North Atlantic.
13th February 2018

Sun's radiation could break up plastics in wastewater

Sun's radiation could break up plastics in wastewater
Harnessing the Sun’s radiation to help rid the oceans of microplastics contamination is one of several technical innovations to be developed by a new EU-funded project. Beginning in November 2017, a system developed at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden for breaking down microplastics from personal care products will be tested for implementation in homes and wastewater treatment plants.
7th November 2017

Global competition aims at more sustainable fashion

Global competition aims at more sustainable fashion
How can the fashion industry become more sustainable? The Global Change Award competition – in which KTH Royal Institute of Technology is a partner – highlights innovations from around the world. Voting is open to all from 27 March. Make your voice heard – and influence how the million euro grant is divided between five winners. H&M Foundation, with KTH and Accenture as partners, launched the global innovation competition Global Change Award (GCA) in 2015.
27th March 2017


Water filter from wood offers portable purification in emergencies

Water filter from wood offers portable purification in emergencies
A bacteria-trapping material developed from wood by researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology is now being tested for use as a water purification filter. The aim is to use it in places where there is no infrastructure or clean water supply. The material, which combines wood cellulose with a positively-charged polymer, can trap bacteria by attracting and binding the bacteria to the material surface.
22nd March 2017

A cheaper way to produce hydrogen from water

A cheaper way to produce hydrogen from water
Scientists at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm now report that they have unlocked one major barrier to exploiting this renewable energy source. Because the best-performing catalysts for electrochemical oxidation, or "water splitting", are expensive precious metals, the research team led by KTH Professor Licheng Sun is one of many worldwide searching for cheaper alternatives. Sun had earlier developed molecular catalysts for water oxidation with an efficiency approaching that of natural photosynthesis.
27th June 2016

Tests show how trucks can reuse engine heat for power

Working with automotive manufacturer Scania, researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology have been testing semi trucks equipped with a system that converts exhaust heat into power — through a process called thermoelectric generation (TEG). The voltage produced by the system can power the truck and reduce the strain on the engine, explains researcher Arash Risseh.
20th May 2016

Wood windows: transparent material for buildings and solar cells

Wood windows: transparent material for buildings and solar cells
Windows and solar panels in the future could be made from one of the best—and cheapest—construction materials known: wood. Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have developed a transparent wood material that's suitable for mass production. Lars Berglund, a professor at Wallenberg Wood Science Center at KTH, says that while optically transparent wood has been developed for microscopic samples in the study of wood anatomy, the KTH project introduces a way to use the material on a large scale.
30th March 2016

Carbon fibre from wood is used to build car

Carbon fibre from wood is used to build car
Swedish researchers have just produced the world's first model car with a roof and battery made from wood-based carbon fibre. Although it's built on the scale of a toy, the prototype vehicle represents a giant step towards realising a vision of new lightweight materials from the forest, one of the benefits of a so-called bioeconomy. The demo is a joint project of KTH Royal Institute of Technology, the Swedish Innventia and Swerea, a research group for industrial renewal and sustainable development.
10th February 2016

The next wave in renewable energy

One of the biggest European investments in ocean energy, the first commercial scale underwater “kite” power plant is being built off the coast of Holyhead, Wales. "Tidal energy is sort of an underwater version of wind energy", explains Stefan Björklund, an assistant professor in machine design at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm.
30th November 2015


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